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Psychiatry Residency Training Program
 
  Applicants Department GME Office Home School of Medicine UW UWHA

Residency Policies & Procedures
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V. CLINICAL ROTATIONS

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR THE FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY ROTATION

Goal: The overall goal of the forensic psychiatry rotation is to provide the resident with supervised clinical experience and instruction in forensic psychiatry.

Supervision: Each resident must receive a minimum of two hours of direct supervision per week, at least one of which is individual, and must have direct access (in person or by telephone) to a supervising attending at all times.

Objectives: Residents completing forensic psychiatry rotations are expected to:

1. Patient Care

  • Perform comprehensive evaluations of defendants, including assessment of competency to stand trial, sanity, diminished capacity/mens rea, and dangerousness.
  • Display the ability to diagnose mental disorders using DSM-IV and other legally relevant nosological approaches.
  • Develop an understanding of the relevance of clinical material and psychiatric models of behavior to legal standards.
  • Display clinical skills in the treatment of patients in forensic settings, including an understanding of the indications for and basic principles of pharmacologic, psychoeducational, group, and/or individual therapy approaches.
  • Participate in the development of appropriate treatment plans.

2. Knowledge

  • Display broad general knowledge of the expected signs, symptoms, course, treatment, and social manifestations of mental disorders (including personality disorders), substance abuse disorders, and the psychiatric expression of medical disorders.
  • Display knowledge of historical and clinical risk factors for violence and criminality and of interventions designed to address these risk factors.
  • Display an understanding of malingering, factitious disorders, and symptom exaggeration.

3. Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

  • Locate and critically appraise scientific literature relevant to forensic questions and/or clinical care.
  • Regularly use information technology in the service of patient care and forensic evaluation.
  • Locate and properly utilize legal and medico-legal information such as statutes, case law, polices, codes, and forensic texts.
  • Participate in practice-based improvement activities (CQI; e.g. case reviews and M&M type case conferences).

4. Interpersonal and Communication Skills

  • Ethically and sensitively obtain information from patients, families, and other sources of collateral information; " Display empathic and critical listening skills.
  • Work effectively as part of a multidisciplinary team in the evaluation and/or care of persons in forensic settings.
  • Write thorough, clear and well-reasoned forensic reports.
  • Testify relevantly and accurately about forensic implications of clinical material.

5. Professionalism

  • Demonstrate respect for others, compassion.
  • Demonstrate integrity, accountability, responsible and ethical behavior.
  • Demonstrate understanding of patients and their illnesses in a sociocultural context, including displaying sensitivity to patients' culture, ethnicity, age, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual minority status, and/or disabilities.

6. Systems-Based Practice

  • Display an understanding of the relationship between the health care system and the legal system.
  • Effectively access and utilizes resources; practice cost effectively.
  • Display and apply an understanding of the differing roles of forensic evaluator and clinical practitioner.
  • Appropriately advocate for quality patient care; help patients with system complexities.

7. Leadership

  • Display effective team leadership skills, including the ability to triage, prioritize tasks, and delegate work as appropriate.
  • Display skills in teaching and supervising medical students.

8. Educational Attitudes

  • Display openness to supervision; accept constructive criticism.
  • Seek direction when appropriate; demonstrate eagerness to learn.

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Psychiatry Residency Training Program
1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 356560
Seattle, WA 98195-6560
206-543-6577
email: psychres@u.washington.edu